The Unfiltered Parenting Video We All Need To Watch

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about how frustrated I am with the "You'll Miss This" videos that crop up all-too-often on my social media feeds.

You know the ones I mean...the ones that tell us to absorb every moment of every day because it all goes by so very fast...without quite acknowledging that some of those moments are bitterly hard.

If, like me, you're fed up of the typical "You'll Miss This" video script, I hereby offer you an alternative.


If you've had enough of being told to absorb every single second of the baby days...of being told how fast the years tick by...of being told you will dissolve into nothingness as soon as your littles have flown the nest (in exactly "18 summers" and counting...) Well, here's a little something for you.

Let's call it perfect imperfection...motherhood unfiltered...BS-free.

Just real moms, real kids and real shit going down.

Enjoy, my friends...

How Formula Giants Are Breaking The Code

Have you heard of the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes?

The Code is an international set of recommendations, which regulates the marketing of breast-milk substitutes and in simple terms, it advocates that babies be breastfed and that any promotion of breast milk substitutes be banned.

The reasoning behind the creation and implementation of The Code is to protect and improve breastfeeding rates.  The World Health Organization (WHO) states that breastfeeding is "unparalleled in providing the ideal food for infants" and research has found that over three quarters of a million lives would be saved yearly if breastfeeding was universally practised:


"The protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding rank among the most effective interventions to improve child survival. Increasing breastfeeding to near-universal levels could save more than 820 000 lives every year."

Yet the industry of breast milk substitutes, currently valued at $70.6 billion, isn't renowned for following the rules.  The Code explicitly states that there should be no advertising or promotion of formula milk, including any advertising through mass media outlets such as websites or social media.  Yet the WHO have found that current marketing practices are increasingly targeting blogs and social media channels:

Uncensored Birth Photos are now ALLOWED on Facebook and Instagram


(Picture credit, @marijkethoen_birthphotography)

In December 2017, Katie Vigos launched a petition asking that Instagram change its censorship policies to reclassify childbirth as educational material, rather than categorising it alongside “pornography, graphic violence and profanity.”  The petition essentially demanded that Instagram addresses its nonsensical stance that brith is too offensive for the public eye.

Before the launch of this petition, moms posting birthing pictures to Instagram and Facebook risked having their photographs permanently deleted and even their accounts shut down.  Yet with more than 23,000 signatures supporting the #IGallowuncensoredbirth petition via the Empowered Birth Project, both Instagram and their parent company Facebook have now officially changed their censorship policies to allow uncensored birth pictures on both platforms.

Don’t Let Good Girl Complex Hold You Back




I am sitting in my friend’s living room, cradling a cup between my palms, as my baby toddles between the women in the room.

One of these women is sharing her business dreams with us and we all nod and smile and tell her how amazing her ideas are.  We are being completely honest.  

Somewhere between the excitement and support I feel for my friend, I'm learning my own lesson about vulnerability.

My baby hands my friend a little piece of treasure found lurking by the bookcase.  She beams at him as she tells us that she’ll need to create a website, and he returns her smile with gusto.

These women are my support network; my tribe.  My children trust them innately.  And yet I shift uncomfortably, as I suddenly feel a little too hot.

I have a website.

I almost whisper it.

The Self-Care For Moms Giveaway!

In celebration of the release of the Self-Care For Moms ebook and four-week program, I'm giving away THREE copies! It's time to make self-care an easy daily habit - so be sure to enter the giveaway below!

Here's how to enter:


“Like” and comment on this post on my Facebook page:

Stop Telling Moms We'll Miss The Baby Years

It's 2pm on a Monday afternoon and I'm currently sitting in my rocking chair, breastfeeding my sleeping one year old.  His tiny hand is clutching my chest and his ribs are rising and falling softly, with his steady, deep and dream-filled breaths.  He is picture-perfect and wouldn't look out of place on the cover of a mummy-and-baby magazine, or featured in the latest "You'll Miss This" video doing the rounds on Facebook.

You know the type of video I mean, right?  The videos with soft focus and smiling cherub-faced babies crawling in and out of shot.  With relaxed mothers kissing tiny toes and playing peekaboo while words flash across the screen...

"The days may be long, but the years are short..."

"One day soon, it will be the last time you rock your little one to sleep..."

"You will look back on these years and rest assured, you will miss this!"

Let me tell you a secret: I hate these videos.

"You'll Miss This" videos have a lot to answer for.  Because they are, quite simply, utterly exploitative.


They are exploiting our mummy-hearts, consciences and fears.  They are tapping into our sleep-deprived vulnerabilities and bleeding us dry.

Self Care For Moms Does Not Look Like That

I think I signed up to the wrong mailing list.

I was lured there with images of smiling women carefully positioned on pastel yoga mats atop a sunny-yet-snow-capped mountain peak.

From a stuffy house in a dreary town, these women seemed to be offering a slice of self-care that they promised was attainable.

They promised it through their white-toothed smiles and catchy headlines.

This morning, one headline in particular caught my eye and stood up, mountain-pose-style, from within my inbox:

"Up Your Self-Care Game With These Quick Daily Rituals"

Nice!  Better self care is something most of us are striving for, right? And as a mom, the word 'quick' literally sang to me.

I'll be honest, I opened the link without hesitation. I should have known better. I should have known what to expect, but sleep deprivation seems to be blurring my BS Barometer...

Here's the first point offered to those of us desperately seeking better self care (and the only one I will mention here, as I couldn't finish reading the article in question due to the simultaneous shock and laughter that overtook my body, and the fact my toddler was traversing the stair gate...):

"Ritualize your morning beverage"

Ok...sounds interesting...maybe they want me to be more mindful when I sip my tea? I could do that!

Not quite, unfortunately:
"Sip your mug [of superfood coffee] slowly in a calm space in your home. I'll sit at my altar and light a candle and burn sage, palo santo, or copal. Then I write or work with oracle cards and drop into a 20 to 30 minute meditation and prayer practice. My meditations consist of breath work, mantra, mindfulness, body scanning, clearing out old resentments, and connecting to my "why" for the day."*


*This is an actual quote.